JOSEPH SCHINDELMAN

  • "Dear folks, I am so sorry to hear about Joe's passing. I..."
    - Neil Rubenstein
  • "I loved the JS's illustrations. The memoriam in the..."
    - Lise Strickler
  • "Dear Schindelman Family: I was Joe's secretary in 1978. I..."
  • "To the dear Schindelmans, My wishes for good memories to..."
    - Sydell Roth
  • "To the Schlndelma family, please accept. My condolence, may..."
Obituary

SCHINDELMAN--Joseph,

of East Williston New York, passed away on August 22, 2018 at the age of 95. As a professional artist, he expressed his unique take on life through various media. He continued to do so well after his retirement as Senior Art Director at a major Madison Avenue advertising agency. He also illustrated over a dozen children's books in his classic pen and ink style in which each whimsical drawing was painstakingly composed of hundreds of tiny pen strokes. Perhaps, most of all, he will be remembered as the original illustrator of Roald Dahl's famous Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, which continues to delight children around the world. In WWII, he served bravely in the United States Army Air Corp as a nose gunner on a B24 bomber upon which he expertly painted a pin-up known as "Our Baby". Perhaps she was the good luck charm who guided Joe and his crew safely through 51 missions over Germany. Joe was an avid fisherman, lover of the surf, nature, and the ever-changing sky. He treated all others with respect, kindness and care, regardless of whether they were complete strangers or family. He was extremely generous with charitable donations, lamenting that there were so many people in need and he wanted to help everyone less fortunate than himself. He was the epitome of a good man. Joe will be greatly missed by Ida, his wife of 73 years, his four children, Dale, Laurel, Maxine and Michael, his granddaughter Samantha, great grandson Lawson, his large extended family, and the many others who were fortunate enough to know him. We will be loving him always...

Published in The New York Times on Sept. 6, 2018
bullet World War II
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