Getty Images / Photo by Ann Summa

Died March 10

Corey Haim was one of the top teen idols of the 1980s, thanks to his boyish good looks, charmingly crooked smile and, of course, his strong acting talent. His breakout performance in Lucas received glowing praise from critic Roger Ebert, and Haim followed it with the career-defining "Lost Boys." He and his frequent co-star, Corey Feldman, became best friends, known as the Two Coreys and beloved by teen girls everywhere. But the perils of childhood stardom took their toll, and much of Haim's life was spent struggling with addiction. He was reportedly clean at the time of his death from pneumonia. We remember Haim's life today as well as the lives of other notable people who died this day in history.

Click to discover notable people who were born this day in history including NASA astronaut Laurel Clark.

2016: Keith Emerson, British keyboardist and founding member of the prog-rock group Emerson, Lake & Palmer, dies at 71.

Emerson formed Emerson, Lake & Palmer, sometimes referred to as ELP, with guitarist Greg Lake and drummer Carl Palmer in 1970. Each member had achieved success with prior bands, so ELP became known as a supergroup. They received a record contract after their breakthrough performance at the Isle of Wight Festival in 1970. Read more

 

 

 

2015: Windell Middlebrooks, U.S. actor known for Miller High Life beer commercials, dies at 36.

2010: Corey Haim, Canadian child and teen actor who appeared in the movies "Lucas" and "Lost Boys," dies of pneumonia at 38.

Corey Haim was 38 when he died, six years ago today. It was a life ended much too soon after struggles with drug addiction. But while some will memorialize Haim with stories of his difficult life, we prefer to remember him for his true legacy: the movies he made. Haim was a natural and talented actor, a 1980s teen heartthrob who charmed his fans whether he was tackling a complex movie role or just offering his lopsided grin in a teen-magazine photo. Roger Ebert, reviewing his breakout role as the title character of "Lucas," praised him highly: "He creates one of the most three-dimensional, complicated, interesting characters of any age in any recent movie. If he can continue to act this well, he will never become a half-forgotten child star, but will continue to grow into an important actor. He is that good."  Read more

 

 

2007: Ernie Ladd, U.S. defensive lineman for the San Diego Chargers who was a four-time All-Star and later became a professional wrestler, dies at 68.

2007: Richard Jeni, U.S. comedian and actor who was on the Comedy Central list of the 100 greatest stand-up comics of all time, commits suicide at 49.

Jeni toured the country regularly with a stand-up act and had starred in several HBO comedy specials, most recently "A Big Steaming Pile of Me" during the 2005-06 season. Another HBO special, "Platypus Man," won a Cable ACE award for best stand-up comedy special, and formed the basis for his UPN sitcom of the same name, which ran for one season. Jeni's movie credits included "The Mask," in which he played Jim Carrey's best friend; "The Aristocrats"; "National Lampoon's Dad's Week Off"; and "An Alan Smithee Film: Burn, Hollywood, Burn." Read more

 

 

 

2005: Danny Joe Brown, U.S. musician who was the lead singer for the band Molly Hatchet, dies at 53.

The 1969 Terry Parker High School graduate joined Molly Hatchet in 1975 and was frontman for the band for its self-titled debut album in 1978 and the follow-up "Flirtin' With Disaster" the next year. Both albums went platinum, but Brown left the band at the start of the 1980s, citing a battle with diabetes. Read more

 

 

 

2004: Dave Blood, aka David Schulthise, U.S. rock musician who was the bassist for the punk band the Dead Milkmen, dies of a drug overdose at 47.

1998: Lloyd Bridges, U.S. actor who appeared in many movies including "Airplane!", acted on TV series including "Sea Hunt," and is the father of actors Beau and Jeff Bridges, dies at 85.

One of Bridges' first successes was on the late-1950s TV show "Sea Hunt." Playing an ex-frogman turned freelance scuba diver, Bridges brought rugged adventure to the screen. Though an inexperienced diver when "Sea Hunt" began, Bridges learned more over the course of the show's four-season run, and he eventually did all his own scuba shots except for the most-dangerous stunts. Read more

 

 

 

1997: LaVern Baker, U.S. rhythm and blues singer who had several hit records on the pop charts including "Tweedle Dee," dies at 67.

Baker sang R&B in the genre's early days … and she did it so well. Though her records weren't smash hits, they were popular on U.S. radio and made waves on the R&B charts. We're listening to a few of her greatest tracks, showcasing the many facets of her musical range and talent. Read more

 

 

 

1996: Lucius E. Burch Jr., U.S. attorney and civil rights leader, dies at 84.

1988: Glenn Cunningham, U.S. athlete who at one time set the world record in the mile run and won a silver medal at the 1936 Berlin Olympics, dies at 78.

1988: Andy Gibb, English singer who had numerous hit songs including "Shadow Dancing" and who was the younger brother of Barry, Maurice, and Robin Gibb of the Bee Gees, dies of a heart infection at 30.

While he sought his own identity, he didn’t stray far from the family business. At 13, he began performing in Ibiza, a tourist destination in Spain popular with vacationing Brits. While it was generally assumed he would join the Bee Gees when he got old enough, Andy was determined to forge his own path. Well, sort of. His first band, Melody Fayre, was named after a Bee Gees song. The first song he recorded in a studio, "My Father Was Reb," was written by his older brother Maurice. Read more

 

 

 

1986: Ray Milland, Welsh actor who had a long career in Hollywood and who won an Academy Award for his performance in "The Lost Weekend," dies at 79.

Ray Milland (Wikimedia Commons)Milland averaged four to five movies a year, still mostly playing supporting roles or secondary leads. He played mostly in light comedies, but he also was featured in memorable noir films and one of the best spooky movies of the 1940s, "The Uninvited." Director Martin Scorcese later cited it as one of the scariest movies of all time. During production of 1939's "Hotel Imperial," Milland insisted on doing his own stunt work and was badly injured in an accident when his saddle came loose during a horse jumping scene and he fell head first into a pile of bricks. Milland was unconscious for nearly 24 hours and had to be hospitalized for two weeks. Read more

 

 

1984: June Marlowe, U.S. film actress who was a star of the silent era and played teacher Miss Crabtree in the "Our Gang" series, dies at 80.

1980: Herman Tarnower, U.S. medical doctor and heart specialist who wrote the best-selling diet book "The Complete Scarsdale Medical Diet," is shot to death by his ex-lover, Jean Harris, at 69.

1968: Helen Walker, U.S. actress who was popular in the 1940s and '50s and appeared in "Brewster's Millions," dies of cancer at 47.

1950: Marguerite De La Motte, U.S. film actress who was most popular in the silent era and starred in "The Mark of Zorro," dies at 47.

1948: Zelda Fitzgerald, U.S. author and wife of writer F. Scott Fitzgerald who was an icon of the 1920s, dies at 47.

1943: Tully Marshall, U.S. actor who was one of the first successful character actors and appeared in such classic movies as "Intolerance," dies at 78.

1913: Harriet Tubman, U.S. abolitionist who freed many slaves along the Underground Railroad, dies at  93.

Tubman's first escape attempt was a bust – her two brothers, with whom she ran, decided to go back and insisted that she go with them. The second time she went alone, relying on brave strangers who smuggled her from Maryland via the Underground Railroad. Her entrance into the free state of Pennsylvania felt magical, she later recalled: "There was such a glory over everything; the sun came like gold through the trees, and over the fields, and I felt like I was in Heaven." Read more

 

 

 

Click to discover notable people who were born this day in history including NASA astronaut Laurel Clark.