Died November 12

Jonathan Brandis was poised for a successful acting career when he made his TV debut at the tender age of 6, appearing on the popular soap opera "One Life To Live." By 14, he was the star of "The NeverEnding Story II: The Next Chapter" and played a lead role in "Stephen King's It." He became a beloved teen idol when he starred on the Steven Spielberg TV series "seaQuest DSV," for which he won a Young Artists Award; he also co-wrote and produced an episode. Brandis was only 27 when he died by suicide. We remember Brandis' life today as well as the lives of other notable people who died this day in history.

Click to discover notable people who were born this day in history including Hollywood legend Grace Kelly.

2016: Lupita Tovar, Mexican-American actress best known for her starring role in the 1931 Spanish language version of Dracula, dies at 106.

2013: Al Ruscio, U.S. character actor who appeared on "Gunsmoke" and "Barney Miller," dies at 89.

Al Ruscio (Associated Press/David LaPorte)Ruscio appeared in such films as "The Godfather Part III" and "Guilty by Suspicion," and on some of the most memorable TV shows of all time, from "Sea Hunt" to "Seinfeld." His stage credits include "A Hatful of Rain" and "A View From the Bridge." In addition, Ruscio taught college acting classes, wrote a drama text called "So Therefore ... A Practical Guide for Actors," and served on the board of directors of the Screen Actors Guild. Read more

 

 

 

2008: Mitch Mitchell, English rock 'n' roll musician and drummer with the Jimi Hendrix Experience, dies in his sleep in a hotel room at 61.

Mitch Mitchell (AP photo)Mitchell was a powerful force on the Hendrix band's 1967 debut album "Are You Experienced?" as well as the trio's albums "Electric Ladyland" and "Axis: Bold as Love." He had an explosive drumming style that can be heard in hard-charging songs such as "Fire" and "Manic Depression," according to his obituary by The Associated Press. Read more

 

 

 

2007: Ira Levin, U.S. novelist whose books include "Rosemary's Baby" and "The Stepford Wives," dies at 78.

Levin began working as a TV writer before finishing his first novel, "A Kiss Before Dying," a murder mystery that was an instant success, according to his obituary by The Associated Press. His debut won the Edgar Allan Poe Award as the best first novel of 1953. It wasn't until 14 years later that Levin completed his second novel, "Rosemary's Baby," the creepy tale of a New York couple in the clutch of Satanists who want the young wife to bear Satan's child. Read more

 

 

 

2003: Tony Thompson, U.S. session drummer and a member of the disco group Chic, dies of kidney cancer at 48.

2003: Jonathan Brandis, U.S. actor, director, screenwriter, and teen heartthrob whose films include "Pet Sematary" and "Dumb and Dumber," dies by suicide at 27.

2003: Penny Singleton, U.S. actress known best for playing Blondie Bumstead in 28 movies during the 1930s and 1940s and for providing the voice for Jane Jetson, the matriarch on "The Jetsons," dies at 95.

2003: Kay Kuter, U.S. actor known best for his role as Newt on the sitcoms "Green Acres" and "Petticoat Junction," dies at 78.

1994: Wilma Glodean Rudolph, U.S. sprinter and three-time Olympic gold medalist, dies of brain cancer at 54.

In 1960, one runner captivated the world at the Summer Olympics in Rome. She was the Black Gazelle, the fastest woman on earth – she was Wilma Rudolph. Rudolph won three gold medals, in the 100 meters, 200 meters, and 4 x 100-meter relay,  becoming the first woman to take three golds in track and field at a single Olympics. In the 200 meters, she set an Olympic record and, along with her teammates, set a world record in the relay. Her accomplishments are awesome … especially when one considers the illness and injury she had to overcome. Read more

 

 

1993: Harry R. Haldeman, U.S. political aide and President Richard M. Nixon's chief of staff during the Watergate scandal, dies of abdominal cancer at 67.

1993: Bill Dickey, U.S. Major League Baseball Hall of Fame catcher with the New York Yankees, dies at 86.

1992: Charles "Honi" Coles, Tony Award-winning U.S. actor and tap dancer, dies of cancer at 81.

1991: Diane Brewster, U.S. actress who played diverse television roles on "Leave It to Beaver," "Maverick," and "The Fugitive," dies of heart failure at 60.

1990: Eve Arden, U.S. actress whose works include the sitcom "Our Miss Brooks" and the films "Grease" and "Grease 2," dies of colorectal cancer at 82.

Arden may have been our all-time favorite teacher. Arden wasn't really a teacher, of course, but she played one on TV. And though Arden took on a wide variety of roles in her five-decade acting career, we remember her best for portraying a pair of educators – one so iconic and beloved that Arden received real-life teaching job offers. Read more

 

 

 

1981: William Holden, U.S. actor who was one of the most popular actors of all time and starred in "The Wild Bunch" and "Network," dies at 63.

After his first film role as an extra, in "Prison Farm," he starred as a violinist/boxer in "Golden Boy" (1939) and had lead roles in a few other movies before he joined the U.S. Army Air Force and, as a second lieutenant, appeared in training films. One of his two younger brothers, a U.S. Navy fighter pilot, was killed in World War II. After his return to Hollywood, he played screenwriter Joe Gillis in "Sunset Boulevard" (1950), which led to his first nomination for a best actor Oscar. Next came "Stalag 17" (1953), "Executive Suite" (1954), "The Country Girl" (1954), "The Bridges at Toko-Ri" (1954), "Sabrina" (1954), "Picnic" (1955), "Love Is a Many-Splendored Thing" (1955) and "The Bridge on the River Kwai" (1957). Read more

 

 

Click to discover notable people who were born this day in history including Hollywood legend Grace Kelly.