Harold Edward Paulus M.D.
1929 - 2019
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August 4, 1929 - April 5, 2019 Harold E. Paulus, MD, Professor Emeritus, University of California, Los Angeles, Department of RheumatologyDr. Harold E. Paulus, age 89, of Encino, CA, died Friday, April 5, 2019, at UCLA Santa Monica Hospital. Harold Paulus, or "Hal" to his friends and family, was born August 4, 1929 in Allentown, Pennsylvania, to Harold F. and Marian Paulus. His mother passed away when Harold was in grammar school. He and his sister Joanne were raised by his father and stepmother, Florence. Harold graduated from Bethlehem High School in June 1957. He graduated "Magna cum laude" and Phi Beta Kappa from Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA, with A.B. degree in 1951. In 1955, Harold earned his M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania Medical School, Philadelphia, PA. Alpha Omega Alpha. From 1955-1956 Dr. Paulus was a Rotating Intern at the Hospital of University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, and he served in the US Army Medical Corps as Captain, from 1956-1958. During summers while attending Lehigh University, working toward his Bachelor's degree, Harold worked at Bethlehem Steel Company where his father, Harold F. Paulus, was a metallographer and Harold E.'s future wife Rita Cota's father also worked in the Accounting Department. Harold's work at Bethlehem Steel included cleaning red hot dripping steel off the rollers in which steel was made into sheets and another summer he worked in a laboratory near his father's office in which young Harold assisted in quality assurance test calculations of the finished steel product. During Harold's third year of medical school, he shadowed a Pennsylvania doctor practicing medicine in North Dakota. Harold earned enough money to buy his first automobile, a 1929 Model A pickup truck for $35.00. He fixed it up and painted it black. Harold and his father enjoyed taking it on fishing trips. Harold recalled being given a hospital cafeteria meal ticket for food but slept in the basement of the doctor's home whom he shadowed. Dr. Paulus was a humble and dedicated student of medicine. Harold met the love of his life, Rita H. Cota, at Lehigh University where they were both students. Rita being three years older was teaching a class in Microbiology, her major, in which Harold was the student. He asked her on a date but she declined stating that she would not date a student. She did, however, recall meeting him years before at the playground where their mothers took them. She recalled his curly locks and hazel eyes. After the course was completed Harold asked her out again and she agreed. Rita worked at a blood bank in Chicago where she worked in the forefront of AIDS research testing blood. Harold would visit her driving his 1929 black Model A. On one of his visits to Chicago, he proposed marriage to Rita. They were married on June 16, 1955, the day after Harold's graduation from medical school. The marriage was held at St. Ursula's Church in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. Harold's bride Rita graduated with a Master of Science degree from Pennsylvania State University receiving and later a Doctor of Philosophy degree in bacteriology from Lehigh University. Harold and Rita moved to Texas after his enlistment in the Army for Army Corps Training and relocated to Maryland for the remainder of his Army service. Harold and Rita moved to Austin, Minnesota, where Dr. Paulus joined the Austin Clinic, a private medical practice. Dr. Paulus held the position of President of the Mower County Medical Society (Minnesota, 1964). It was in Austin, Minnesota, where Harold and Rita adopted their two wonderful children, Cynthia "Cyndy" Susan Paulus and Andrew "Andy" James Paulus. In 1965, Harold, Rita, Cyndy and Andrew moved to California where Harold became a Resident of Internal Medicine at the Wadsworth Hospital Veterans Administration Center, Los Angeles, CA. He later become a Rheumatology Fellow studying under his mentor, Carl Pearson, M.D. at UCLA Medical Center. He completed a clinical pharmacology fellowship at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles in 1969. In 1969, he became assistant professor of medicine in residence in UCLA Medical Center and began his career as clinician-educator. He was certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine in May 1969. Dr. Paulus became an associate director of the Institute of Rehabilitation and Chronic Diseases, UCLA. In 1972, he became associate professor of medicine at UCLA School of Medicine. In 1977 he became director of the Division of Rheumatology, UCLA School of Medicine and in 1978 a professor of medicine at UCLA School of Medicine. In 1981, he became action director of the Division of Rheumatology, UCLA School of Medicine. In 1999, he becomes emeritus professor of medicine at UCLA School of Medicine. Dr. Paulus became an institution within the UCLA Division of Rheumatology with over forty years as a practicing doctor, scientist and researcher, mentor and well-respected colleague. Dr. Paulus served on an ad hoc committee set up by the FDA on clinical trial guidelines for arthritis treatments. Dr. Paulus co-authored clinical testing guidelines that became known as a pivotal force in the dawning disease-modifying antirheumatic drug era. He was recognized with numerous awards for his dedication to rheumatologic research and mentorship. Dr. Paulus held medical licenses in Pennsylvania, Minnesota and California. Professional societies includes: American Federation for Clinical Research, American Rheumatism Association, Southern California Chapter of American Rheumatism Association, American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics and the Southern California Chapter of the Arthritis Foundation (Medical and Scientific Committee). Among numerous honors and awards, Dr. Paulus was awarded the Spirit of Hope Award of Scleroderma Foundation. Dr. Paulus was the Director of the Human Subject Protection Committee at UCLA and the ACR (American College of Rheumatology) Criteria Subcommittees. He has served as chair of the Carl M. Pearson Memorial Symposium, Frontiers of Rheumatology, in Rancho Mirage and Marina Del Rey, California, since 1983. Dr. Paulus was also on the editorial board for Arthritis and Rheumatism in addition to serving as reviewer for several leading medical journals including Journal of Rheumatology, Mayo Clinic Proceedings, and Annals of Internal Medicine. Dr. Paulus has authored and co-authored over 200 research articles and reviews in leading scientific journals in addition to over 50 book chapters and 140 abstracts on rheumatic diseases. Dr. Paulus traveled around the world as a researcher and lecturer. He and Rita enjoyed traveling as well including locations such as Scotland, Europe, Canada, Australia, and they really enjoyed camping with their children all over the western United States and Canada. Dr. Harold E. Paulus, known to be a very private person, felt it very important in his last weeks to share stories with his children about his life in which many details were learned and contributed to this reflection and memory of his life. Harold is survived by his two loving children, Cyndy and Andy, two grandsons, Joshua Ian Manning and Robert Michael Manning and three great-granddaughters: Alleigh Anne, Scarlett River and Willow Marie. He will be remembered as a loving father, devoted husband, highly respected clinician scientist and a great mentor to young medical students, trainees and fellows. Honoring the Life of Dr. Harold E. Paulus Services will include a Funeral Mass at the Holy Cross Mortuary Chapel at Holy Cross Cemetery, 5835 W. Slauson, Culver City, CA 90230 on Monday, April 15, 2019 at 11:00 a.m., followed by a Reception sponsored by Dr. Paulus' children, Cyndy and Andrew. Donations, in lieu of flowers, may be sent to the Harold E. Paulus Memorial Fund in Rheumatology at UCLA at the below address. www.giving.ucla.edu/DrHaroldPaulusMemorial UCLA Health Sciences Development Attn: Jennifer Brown, 10945 Le Conte Avenue, Suite 3132 Los Angeles, CA 90095 310.206.2435

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Published in Los Angeles Times from Apr. 10 to Apr. 14, 2019.
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32 entries
May 23, 2020
Young Harold
Andrew Paulus
Son
May 23, 2020
An e-mail written to my sister, dated September 6th, 2010:

Hi There!

I was at Mom and Dad's house yesterday, not really to do a lot of cleaning or anything since I already did that last week. I went over there to put up that new bathroom light fixture and just to hang out for a while. I brought lunch. We had a good casserole I made, consisting of chicken sausage, vegetables, roasted potatoes and Rotini pasta. I also baked some yummy honey biscuits. So it was a nice relaxing way to spend the afternoon.

But what really made the day something special was our chats. The three of us sat in the living room and chatted over coffee. We talked about current events, as we usually do, and about what I'm going to do with my car and things like that.

We also chatted our concerns about your situation but felt better knowing that you are in good hands regarding the proposed treatment and care.

But what was really interesting was our chat about daddy's childhood. I learned some things that I never asked or knew before and I wanted to share that with you before I forget. We know a lot about Mom's childhood more but not a whole lot about Dad's. And he was so willing to share which I thought was cool. Here's what I learned from our awesome Dad.

When Mom and Dad were little kids, they lived in different neighborhoods of Bethlehem but shared a common playground. Mom remembers Dad when they were kids. She said he had lots of blond curly hair and that he was always one of the nice boys. Meaning, he wasn't one of the mean boys who would kick down their sand castles. "Some boys would do that, you know, just because they could," Mom said.

Dad lived with his mother, father and younger sister, in a row house. Theses were very common housing of the day whereby several houses were stuck together sharing common walls on either side. But they all had their own separate front door and sitting patio in the front. They had stairs to get up to the front doors.

Mom and Dad didn't go to the same schools. They went to separate schools.

Dad's mother's name was Marian Schaeffer and she was Pennsylvania Dutch. His father was a metallurgist with the Bethlehem steel mills. His job was to study the strength and integrity of the metals and when they failed, his job was to study why it failed and find solutions. He worked at the steel mills all his life at this job.

When Dad was seven years old, his mother died of a ruptured appendix. It was a sad time for the family but it was not their first loss. Dad actually had an older sister who died at childbirth.

Interestingly, Mom's mother and Dad's mother knew each other from the playgrounds. When Dad's mother died, they moved to another part of town to be closer to Aunt Grace, Dad's mom's sister. And a couple other cousins around his own age were in that part of town as well.

He actually moved farther away from Mom and she didn't see him anymore for a while.

When Dad was in junior high school and high school, he would spend his summers working in the steel mills. He had various jobs but his first job was very hot, sweaty and labor intensive. When the hot steel was being moved from one location to another, a lot of the debris would spill over into traps below. It was his job (along with others) to clean out those traps.

He said when he first started, one worker asked him if he wanted to use a big shovel or a little shovel. Being a "dumb kid" as he put it, he opted for the big shovel, but soon found out that the metal debris was so heavy and he couldn't pick up a fully loaded big shovel. He said he soon learned to go with the little shovel.

As the summers went on, so did his jobs, and they became less labor intensive. He recalled working one summer in the lab.

Mom recalled also working within the labs of the mills and remembers them being "hot as Hades," as she put it.

The Bethlehem steel mills were the biggest and best of the day. All good steel came from the mills and almost everyone worked in some way connected to them.

When Dad went to college, he bought his first car, a Model A Ford, for around $35. He later sold it for about $40 and bought a Mercury.

Later, Mom and Dad came together again in college and dated. Dad said he wasn't the party animal type and more of the bookworm type.

Fast forward a few years after they were married when Dad was stationed in the army in Minnesota. They lived on base in one of the provided housing units. Later, once his tour was done, they moved to an apartment and decided to start a family. This was when you came into the picture and you lived for a short while in that apartment too.

Mom had a friend that told her about a nice house nearby on 12th Place NW in Austin. They saw it, liked it, and bought it. Later, in 1961, I came along. And, in 1964, our dog Copper joined us.

Right about that time, Dad was offered a fellowship in California. Mom wasn't too keen on the idea at all. You see, she recalled as a child seeing a newsreel in the theater that portrayed the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and, as Mom put it, "That had a lasting impression on me, and I thought to myself, 'that doesn't look like a place I would ever want to go.'"

Well, later in 1964, we packed our bags and headed on a two week vacation to California. Copper stayed behind at a local friend's house.

We apparently took the long scenic route, traveling south from Minnesota and crossing over through Kansas. This is where we met a fierce snowstorm and were hold up in a motel for three days. We loved it, playing in the snow and having all kinds of fun.

We continued south to San Diego and traveled up California, through La Jolla, Los Angeles, etc., to San Francisco. It was during that trip that Mom decided California wasn't so bad after all, so they sold the house and we moved to Santa Monica.

And the rest, as they say, is history. =)

Well, I hope you enjoyed this little trip down memory lane as much as I did. I learned some new things and I hope you did too.

Take care and remember, everything's going to be ok! =)

Much love,

Andy

Andrew Paulus
Son
May 10, 2020
Dad & Me...
Dad loved our walks in the park.
Andrew Paulus
Son
May 10, 2020
Thinking of you, Dad, and missing you and Mom today, on Mother's Day.
Andrew Paulus
Son
December 25, 2019
Merry Christmas, Dad, we love you!
Andrew Paulus
Son
November 16, 2019
Thinking of you, dad, and missing you...
Andrew Paulus
Son
August 4, 2019
Andrew Paulus
Son
August 4, 2019
Happy 90th Birthday, Dad! Much love to you and Mom...
Andrew Paulus
Son
June 18, 2019
Happy Father's Day, dad, and Happy 64th wedding anniversary! Much love to you and mom...
Andrew Paulus
Son
April 29, 2019
Uncle Harold lived on the west coast, his sister Joanne (our Mom) on the east coast, so we did not have very much opportunity to visit with Hal and Rita, but I do recall some visits when I was young. Mom tells a story about Hal rescuing us when he stopped in for a visit while moving out to the Midwest. Our Dad was on a top secret work trip in Florida (he was an optical engineer and some of the projects were DoD and space related), and the trip was extended several times. Mom did not drive, we were out of groceries and money and beginning to get a little desperate. Rita stayed with the 5 of us kids and Hal took Mom out and bought us a month's supply of food! Mom has always treasured her family, and especially her brother Hal. He will be missed!
Anne (Paulus) Davis-Heim
April 17, 2019
Missing my dad, every moment, of every day. I love you, Dad.
Andrew Paulus
Son
April 17, 2019
Ladies and gentlemen, family and friends, colleagues of our dad, and to all of those who are thinkers of great thoughts, doers of great deeds, and speakers of great words, we are humbled and honored to share with you today, some of our thoughts and memories, of our dad.

Every one of you, gathered here today, have come to pay your respects, your honor, and your love, for a man who is so greatly admired, so revered, so greatly cherished and appreciated, and who comes with such high regard and esteem. It is simply, breathtaking.

At this time, we wish to share with you, just a few of our personal musings of our dad, because most of you know him as Dr. Paulus. We know him, simply, as dad.

One of my earliest memories was in Minnesota, where I was born. I was a little fella and I recall my dad being so grand and so tall. I looked up to him, literately. He wore a dark suit and skinny tie and although I really didn't understand what he did or where he went, I was always so happy to see him when he came back.

Our dad was a conservative man. A man of few words but the ones he chose to speak, spoke volumes. With him, as the saying goes, he did not need to chew his cabbage twice. He was not going to repeat himself. You heard it the first time, and that was all you were going to get.

He was not an excitable man. A very calm, carefully worded and thoughtful man. An image I, myself, aspire to achieve and by now you may be saying, well, that sounds just like the Hal we know. And we would say to you, well yes, you are probably right. And then we would say, well, that sounds just like the dad we know too.

In the early 1960's, we moved to California and to Santa Monica and my sister and I each share a memory of dad taking us to the elementary school playground one fine Saturday morning, to teach us to ride our bicycles, without our training wheels. We were so excited.

I remember my turn, with wrench in hand, he unbolted my training wheels and with one good push, off I went with the wind behind me and my dad running beside. I felt safe. I knew he would not let me fall. And as soon as he thought I could make it on my own, he stopped running, and I rode on ahead. He was so proud of us. And we, of him.

As we came into the 1970's, one thing we remember is dad buying a pop-up camper. The kind you towed behind your car and opened up into a sort-of tent trailer. I, myself, would have preferred to stay in a hotel but we found much fun and adventure driving up and down the coast in the Chevrolet Suburban, trailer in tow, with mom at his side (she had map duty) guiding us to our destination. Our dad really enjoyed these outings. And we did too. We had campfires, went on hikes and trails, roasted marshmallows, went fishing, and other adventures of the day.

1971 brought our first experience with an earthquake and I remember being so petrified to move, only to be suddenly and without hesitation swept into the protecting arms of my dad and carried to safety. He was my superman. My super. Man.

The robust and rebellious years of our teenage youth pushed ever so steadfastly forward and our dad was always there, to protect from a quiet distance, to guide when guidance was needed, to advise, when advice was requested.

We remember one day in the mid 1970's he came home with a very large ping-pong table. This was a lot of fun for us. We spent many wonderful summer afternoons in friendly games and dad was actually very good. He beat me almost every time.

He enjoyed doing many of the home repair projects that a lot of us would just call a repair person to do. He taught me a lot and I learned to be able to do a lot of things around the house. He taught me how to paint, how to repair the roof, how to replace electrical switches and sockets, install a light fixture, re-wire a lamp, install a garbage disposal, a toilet, and how to repair leaks in broken pipes. He also taught me how to do a lot of garden work as well. He showed me how to dig and install a drainage system, how to install and repair sprinkler lines, and how to plant and maintain a beautiful lawn of green grass. He was truly a man, of many talents.

I once asked him, if he didn't become a doctor, what would have wanted to be. He said probably an Engineer. I said, I can see that. Makes perfect sense.

I wish I could say that I have a lot of funny or silly anecdotes to share with you about my dad. He was not a big joke teller. He was not a prankster nor a circus clown. But one thing that he was, was a man who loved his family without condition, without question, without judgement.

After our mom passed nearly three years ago, it was hard for him to lose the love of his life and we soon learned this will be a new chapter for us and to get to know dad in a whole new way. He became my "good-time buddy" in a way. I took him on afternoon outings to the park to see the lake and to feed the ducks, to wonderful museums of learning and education, to inspiring movies with the most comfortable theater seating, and to other fun places of the day.

I took him to Chili's a few times, he really liked Chili's. I usually ordered tacos, he would have their famous chili, and we would both enjoy a margarita as we sat in the bar area and watched all the various sporting events overhead. He really enjoyed that.

He was a quietly social man and he really looked forward to our outings. We went to other local places for lunch, like Fat Sal's or The Stand or Tres Hermanos. He really liked those places. He liked going to new places that he had never been before.

We are so grateful to have him as our dad. We are so grateful to have been able to have the opportunity to spend so much time with him these last few years. They have been the best years for me, and we'll remember them fondly and cherish our time with dad, forever.






Andrew Paulus
Son
April 15, 2019
Cyndy Paulus
April 15, 2019
Cyndy Paulus
April 15, 2019
Cyndy Paulus
April 15, 2019
Cyndy Paulus
April 15, 2019
Cyndy Paulus
April 15, 2019
Cyndy Paulus
April 15, 2019
Cyndy Paulus
April 15, 2019
I met Dr. Paulus as a Rheumatology Fellow, rotating from Cedars-Sinai to UCLA in 1974-75. Hal was the most approachable attending at UCLA, treating fellows with warmth and respect. He was a wonderful teacher, always available to listen and advise; a mentor and role model for us all.
-Richard Ress, MD
Richard Ress
April 15, 2019
I'm forever indebted to Dr. Paulus who continually pushed me to be a better thinker, better student and worker, and a better person. He affected so many lives and always seemed to find the humor and the good in each one.

Dr. Paulus will always be remembered as the best boss I ever had. He was firm, yet gentle. Sharp, yet sweet. It's a wonder he continued to be a mentor to me since I first met him in 1996, and that our last conversation was the end of March. He was still trying to improve people and methods even in the rehabilitation center.

I will cherish the friendship and mentorship, and I will treasure the memories. Thank you, Dr. Paulus, always.
Grace West
April 11, 2019
We lost one of the most incredible human beings I've ever known in my life.
When I came to work at UCLA in the Division of Rheumatology, Dr. Paulus was one of the first persons I met and started working with when I was only 22 years old. He was one of the most kindest, brightest, integral and humblest of human beings that I have ever had the opportunity to know. I was privileged to work with him for 19 years from 1990 to 2009 and during that time, he taught me so much both personally and professionally and played a huge role in the woman I am today.
He treated everyone equally, whether you were one of his colleagues or the cleaning crew, he welcomed you into his office with a smile and listening ear. He mentored more residents, fellows and colleagues than I can count while setting the example by treating his patients with the upmost dignity, respect and genuine compassion.
I will never forget this extraordinary and am honored to have had him in my life. I know many echo my sentiments of his accomplishments and attributes and the outstanding person that he was.
He will be sorely missed.
Tina Burger
Tina Burger
April 11, 2019
My last day at UCLA with Dr. Paulus attending our luncheon
Tina Burger
April 10, 2019
Cyndy Paulus
April 10, 2019
Cyndy Paulus
April 10, 2019
2018 Rheumatology Dept Thanksgiving
Cyndy Paulus
April 10, 2019
2018 required employer training
Cyndy Paulus
April 10, 2019
Cyndy Paulus
April 10, 2019
Cyndy Paulus
April 10, 2019
Dr. Paulus will be fondly remembered for his warmth, kindness, sense of humor and strong work ethics. It was a great honor and privilege to know him and his awesome family. I am forever grateful for his guidance and friendship. Deepest condolences.
Weiling Chen
April 10, 2019
April 10, 2019
Missing my Pops
So blessed to call this wonderful man, Dad.
Cyndy Paulus
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