Born July 1

Diana, Princess of Wales, was widely admired, in her native England and abroad. The shy 20-year-old who married Prince Charles and became a princess blossomed into a confident and socially conscious woman who worked with causes including homelessness, removal of landmines, and HIV and AIDS awareness. She took a nontraditionally hands-on approach to raising her sons, Prince William and Prince Harry, endearing herself to the public as she traveled with them and devoted herself to their care. The world mourned at her shocking death in a car accident at 36. We remember Princess Diana's life today as well as the lives of other notable people who were born this day in history.

Click to discover notable people who died this day in history including Hollywood legend Marlon Brando.

1961: Diana, Princess of Wales, English monarch who was the first wife of Prince Charles and the mother of Prince William and Prince Harry, is born in Sandringham, England.

But as we have watched her sons become men (and go through love and scandal of their own), the things we remember best about Diana are the positives. She was committed to helping others, with an impressive group of charities she supported. She was a devoted mother, one who was determined to raise her sons herself. And, if we're being honest about the things we loved about her, she was a style icon, a woman who, like her daughter-in-law Kate today, delighted us with her sensibly fabulous fashion. Read more

 

 

 

1957: Lisa Blount, U.S. actress and producer who played Lynette Pomeroy in "An Officer and a Gentleman," is born in Fayetteville, Arkansas.

Lisa Blount (AP photo)Blount won an Academy Award in 2001 for best live-action short film as producer of "The Accountant." Her husband, Ray McKinnon, directed and starred in the film. She also earned a Golden Globe nomination for playing Debra Winger's best friend in "An Officer and a Gentleman" in 1982. Read more

 

 

 

1955: Keith Whitley, U.S. country singer who had No. 1 hits with "When You Say Nothing at All" and "I'm No Stranger to the Rain," is born in Ashland, Kentucky.

1942: Andraé Crouch, U.S. gospel singer who is considered the Father of Modern Gospel Music, is born in San Francisco, California.

Andrae Crouch (AP Photo/Kevork Djansezian, File)In a career that spanned more than half a century, Crouch wrote dozens of songs, including gospel favorites such as "The Blood Will Never Lose Its Power," "My Tribute (To God Be the Glory)" and "Soon and Very Soon," which was sung at a public memorial to Michael Jackson. Since he debuted in 1960, Crouch collected seven Grammys. He also helped pioneer the burgeoning "Jesus Music" movement from the late 1960s and '70s that started the spread of contemporary Christian music. Read more

 

 

 

1939: Karen Black, U.S. actress whose notable films include "Easy Rider," "The Great Gatsby," and "Nashville," is born in Park Ridge, Illinois.

Karen Black (Associated Press/Marty Lederhandler)Known for her full lips and thick, wavy hair that seemed to change color from film to film, Black often portrayed women who were quirky, troubled, or threatened. Her breakthrough was as a prostitute who takes LSD with Dennis Hopper and Peter Fonda in 1969's "Easy Rider," the hippie classic that helped get her the role of Rayette Dipesto, a waitress who dates – and is mistreated by – an upper-class dropout played by Jack Nicholson in 1970's "Five Easy Pieces." Read more

 

 

 

1935: James Cotton, Grammy Award-winning blues harmonica player, was born in Tunica, Mississippi. 

1934: Sydney Pollack, U.S. movie director who won an Academy Award for "Out of Africa" and was nominated for "Tootsie" and "They Shoot Horses, Don't They?", is born in Lafayette, Indiana.

Pollack initially had his sights set on an acting career. In 1961, he was working behind the scenes on the movie "The Young Savages" when star Burt Lancaster urged him to try his hand at directing. As Pollack recalled on NPR's "Fresh Air" years later, Lancaster called Universal Studios boss Lew Wasserman and said, "Lew, I got a kid here. I don't know if he can direct, but he's talented. … In any case, he can't be worse than those bums you got working for you now." Read more

 

 

 

1930: Bobby Day, U.S. singer-songwriter who had a hit in 1958 with "Rockin' Robin," is born in Fort Worth, Texas.

1925: Farley Granger, U.S. actor known best for his performances in the Alfred Hitchcock movies "Rope" and "Strangers on a Train," is born in San Jose, California.

Farley Granger (AP Photo)He made "Rope" in 1948 and "Strangers on a Train" in 1951. In the latter, he played a tennis star who meets a man on a train. The other man, played by Robert Walker, turns out to be a psychotic who proposes that each of them murder the other's troublesome relative. He tells Granger's character, "Some people are better off dead – like your wife and my father, for instance." Walker's character proceeds to carry out his part of the bargain, killing the tennis star's estranged wife and trapping the Granger character in an ever-tightening circle of suspicion. Read more

 

 

 

1924: Florence Stanley, U.S. actress who played Bernice Fish on "Barney Miller" and its spinoff, Fish, is born in Chicago, Illinois.

1922: Toshi Seeger, U.S. filmmaker and activist who created documentaries on folk music and was the wife of singer Pete Seeger, is born in Munich, Germany.

Toshi Seeger (Photo by Astrid Stawiarz/Getty Images)The couple built their cabin in Beacon, New York, after World War II and stayed on the high spot of land by the Hudson River for the rest of their lives. The couple raised three children. The singer recalls on the spoken-word CD "Pete Seeger: The Storm King" how his extraordinary wife raised their young family in the cabin initially without running water or electricity while he spent months on the road. "I'd be away. She'd put one baby on her hip and the other tugging at her skirt and walk 150 yards down a steep slope into a ravine where there was a little brook of clear water and she got a pail and walked back with water to wash with and cook with," Seeger said. Read more

 

 

1920: Harold Sakata, U.S. wrestler and actor who played James Bond villain Oddjob in "Goldfinger," is born in Holualoa, Hawaii.

1915: Willie Dixon, U.S. blues musician who was instrumental in the creation of the Chicago blues sound, is born in Vicksburg, Mississippi.

1912: Sally Kirkland, U.S. journalist who was the fashion editor at Life magazine from 1947 to 1969, is born in El Reno, Oklahoma.

1906: Estée Lauder, U.S. businesswoman who founded the cosmetics company that bears her name, is born in Queens, New York.

The secret to success, according to makeup maven Estée Lauder: hard work, perseverance, and determination. It was this relatively simple formula that propelled Lauder from her early life in Queens, as one of nine children born to Eastern European Jewish immigrants, to head of her own international cosmetics conglomerate. From the beginning, when she was a teen helping market and sell her uncle's face creams, Estée Lauder worked. She became known for her hands-on sales techniques, visiting every new store or cosmetics counter opening, even after she became successful and famous. Read more

 

 

1902: William Wyler, German-American film director who won Academy Awards for "Ben-Hur," "The Best Years of Our Lives," and "Mrs. Miniver," is born in Mülhausen, German Empire.

1901: Irna Phillips, U.S. actress and writer who created many soap operas, including "As the World Turns" and "Another World," is born in Chicago, Illinois.

1899: Thomas A. Dorsey, U.S. pianist and composer who wrote well-known gospel songs including "Take My Hand, Precious Lord" and "Peace in the Valley," is born in Villa Rica, Georgia.

Click to discover notable people who died this day in history including Hollywood legend Marlon Brando.