Myron O. "Mike" Beatty

Obituary
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HANOVER Myron "Mike" O. Beatty passed away on June 26, 2011, at Homewood at Plum Creek in Hanover, from complications of pulmonary fibrosis. Mike was born on August 29, 1926, at his parents' home in the caretaker's house of the Concord Cemetery in Grove City, Franklin County, Ohio. His parents spent most of their lives as farmers. Mike always had a job, beginning at age six. During his earlier years, he delivered movie reels to movie houses for the Film Transit Company, which allowed him to see newly released movies and meet some of the stars of the time. He washed delivery trucks, and he skinned sausage in the J. Fred Schmidt Packing Company; he would go to the 4th Street Market to gather leftover fruit and vegetables to help feed the family. He painted fences at the Olentangy Amusement Park, he ground glass at Ohio Radiator, and he was an ice cream delivery boy on a bike (for about a week). He delivered false teeth to dental offfices, handed out flyers for movie theaters, and delivered newspapers twice a day. Mike was an original member of the Broad Street Church Boychoir which became the Columbus Boychoir, now known as the American Boychoir. While distributing My Weekly Reader Magazines, Mike was the beneficiary of the generosity of local businessmen who contributed funds to purchase warm clothes for newsboys through the organization known as Charity Newsies. These warm and sturdy clothes provided a wardrobe which enabled Mike and many others to work and attend school. Mike attended South High School in Columbus, Ohio, but left before graduation to join the defense effort. He worked in the spare-parts division of The Depot, now the Defense Supply Center, Columbus. One of his tasks was to dip and wrap items to be sent to the European theater with Cosmoline, used to prevent corrosion. He was an insurance clerk in the Ohio Governor's Mansion, and worked in the mailroom in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, all before joining the Army at age 17. Mike served during WWII as an Army Military Police. He was stationed at Fort Hood in Texas, Camp Gruber in Oklahoma, Camp Maxey in Texas, Camp Atterbury in Indiana and Camp George G. Meade in Maryland. He met his wife of 63 years, on January 1, 1946 at a function at Camp Meade. They married on August 31, 1946. He received a GED from the State of Maryland after discharge from the Army. He attended the McCoy College of the Johns Hopkins University. After being mustered out of the Army, Mike went to work at the C.M. Athey Paint Company in Baltimore. He retired as the VP and General Manager in 1991, after 45 years of service. He helped Athey to develop a latex paint using surplus ingredients from WWII. Mike created his own wood stains; the one which gave him the most pride was the one used on The Church of St. Michaels and All Angels, St Paul St, Baltimore, Md., which is still on the beams today. He developed the curbing paint and wall finish for the Baltimore Harbor Tunnel. He developed the prototype for the highway line stripe-paint. He was the first to develop fire retardant paint. He also developed the paint used for Life-Like train products. Famous structures, on which paint he sold was used, included the U.S. Capitol Building, White House, East Haddam Bridge, I-83 and I-695 bridge overpasses, I-695 bridges, and Potomac River Bridge. He also formulated the paint for Project Liberty Ship Baltimore in 1988 when the SS John W. Brown, one of two remaining Liberty ships after WWII, was re-dedicated. Mike remained active in the paint and varnish industry and helped set up the display at the Baltimore Industrial Museum, commemorating the role the Baltimore paint manufacturers played in Baltimore's history. Only recently, Mike received his high school diploma from South High School through Operation Recognition-Veterans Diploma Project administered by the Columbus City School District. Mike and June were past members of Arlington Presbyterian Church and Timonium Presbyterian Church, and most recently attended United Church of Christ at Homewood at Plum Creek. While spending most of his adult life in Maryland, 51 of those years in Historic Lutherville, he participated in the Lutherville Community Association. He was a member of the Oregon Ridge Country Club and later the Rolling Road Country Club. He enjoyed playing golf, woodworking, building things, making his own stains, playing cards, traveling and square dancing. Mike and June moved to Hanover, in 2005 to enjoy the retirement life and the serenity at Homewood at Plum Creek. In addition to his beloved wife, the late June (nee Kauffman) and parents Garnet Lillian Rose (nee Gochenour) Beatty and William Sheldon Beatty, he was predeceased by his siblings William S. Beatty, Robert L. Beatty, Betty Lou Seltzer and Donald M. Beatty, and his son-in-law Alfred M Francis, Jr. He is survived by his adoring daughters, Nancy L. Thayer of St. Albans, Vermont, Kathleen B. Francis of Finksburg, Maryland, and Janice L. Bryant of Mint Hill, North Carolina; and admiring sons-in-law, Richard B. Thayer, and Richard E. Bryant. Also surviving are his granddaughters, Deborah G. Thayer of St Albans, Vermont and Sarah E. Bryant of Parkville, Maryland. He is also survived by two step-grandchildren, Alfred M. Francis III and Michelle J. Winkler; along with four great-grandchildren; and one great-great-granddaughter. He also has several nieces and nephews. A memorial service will be held at the Chapel at Homewood at Plum Creek, 425 Westminster Ave., Hanover, PA, 17331 on Thursday at 10 a.m. with the Reverend Joel B. Hummel officiating. Those desiring to make contributions in Mike's memory might consider the Homewood Benevolent Fund at Homewood at Plum Creek, (425 Westminster Ave. Hanover, PA 17331); the Visiting Nurses Association of Hanover and Spring Grove Hospice (440 N Madison St. Hanover, PA 17331); or Charity Newsies (4300 Indianola Ave Columbus, Ohio 43214). Funeral arrangements are being handled by Wetzel Funeral Home in Hanover, PA. Condolences may be left at www.wetzelfuneralhome.com
Published in Evening Sun on June 29, 2011
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